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Maybe This is the Divine

Posted January 26, 2016

planting trees

I speak and write all the time about the divine essence of human beings. I keep insisting we are made in God's image and are inherently good, despite all appearances.

Every now and then, someone proves it.

Read more here . . .

(My blog has moved to Patheos.com, a large site that is "hosting the conversation
on faith." After you've read this week's blog, I invite you to look
around the site, which is divided into channels for different faiths -- Catholic,
Muslim, Mormon, even Pagan and Atheist. I'm on the Spirituality Channel.)

   

Is Making a "C" in Life Good Enough?

Posted January 19, 2016

ballerina

We hear that people who are true masters of their craft have spent
10,000 hours working on it. Are you a master of anything? Is it okay not to be?

Read about it here.

(My blog has moved to Patheos.com, a large site that is "hosting the conversation
on faith." After you've read this week's blog, I invite you to look
around the site, which is divided into channels for different faiths -- Catholic,
Muslim, Mormon, even Pagan and Atheist. I'm on the Spirituality Channel.)

photo by Rodrigo Denubila

   

Stop Searching for Spiritual Laws

Posted January 13, 2016

Hubble picReally, aren't you getting a little tired of hearing the same spiritual teachings again and again from workshops, speakers and books? They're just so basic, so old hat. Isn't there something new and exciting we could learn instead? Read about it here.


(My blog has moved to Patheos.com, a large site that is "hosting the conversation on faith." After you've read this week's blog, I invite you to look around the site, which is divided into channels for different faiths -- Catholic, Muslim, Mormon, even Pagan and Atheist. I'm on the Spirituality Channel.)

   

Five Ways to Test Your Dream

Posted January 2, 2016

lotus blossom


One thing I've learned about New Year's resolutions or setting goals and intentions is to ask why.

Why do I want this?

Why would this be a good thing?

Knowing why I'm trying to achieve something helps keep me on track.

The trick is not to judge the answer.

For instance, let's say you want to write a book. Why?

  • To make money
  • To help people
  • To prove yourself to your peers
  • To leave a legacy

No single reason is better than another, except to you personally. Just be sure to have a reason and remember the reason.

There are bound to be times when you feel stuck or bogged down, and you'll need to remember why you wanted to do this in the first place.

Why lose 20 pounds this year?

Why stop smoking?

Why meditate longer every day?

What do you expect to receive or change in your life if you do the things you say you want to do?

Your answers to why might surprise you.

You might discover you've been focusing on what you think you should do, or what others have told you they think is important, when, really, it doesn't matter much to you. You might have no good reason for pursuing those goals.

Go within to determine your deepest desires and why you want them.

I like to use Mary Morrissey's five-step test for any dream or vision to decide whether it's worthy of my time and effort, whether it really is the highest possibility for me.

1. Does it give me life?

When you imagine reaching your goal or living in your vision, how do you feel? Thrilled? Exhilarated? On top of the world? If it's nothing but meh, keep imagining.

2. Does it align with my core values?

Let's say you have a chance to star on Broadway, but it would mean working every evening, and you think it's important to be at home with your children. You don't have to abandon your dream if it doesn't fit with your other priorities. Ask for divine help in revising it, in finding different but equally satisfying opportunities. Your true vision won't conflict.

3. Does it cause me to grow?

A vision for your life – or even your ordinary New Year's resolutions – should require you to stretch. If not, if they're something you can handle with one hand tied behind your back, they're not worthy of you.

4. Does it require a power greater than myself?

If you already know exactly how you will accomplish your intentions and you already have all the skills, time, money and resources you need, then your dream isn't big enough. When your vision is truly worthy, you'll have only a vague idea of how to get from here to there. The details will have to be filled in by a designer greater than you.

5. Does it have some good in it for others?

Most dreams do, even if they seem to be solitary pursuits. Let's say you want to lose weight. It benefits you, of course, but your living longer would also benefit your family. Setting an example for good health could influence your friends. Once you think about it, you might discover you can tweak your vision to serve others in a larger way.

I've found that knowing why I am pursing a particular goal, and testing its worthiness with these five questions, takes the angst out of the journey. I don't have to wonder whether I'm doing the right thing or why this was supposed to be fun.

We seem naturally to set goals and entertain visions at the start of a new year. But don't do it alone! Be sure to work in collaboration with your higher self to find exactly the right points of focus for you in 2016.

Of course, you have free will, and you can create anything your imagination conjures up.

But you also have divine help waiting and available. You only have to ask.


PS -- I'm curious – does asking why change any of the goals or intentions you have for this year? I hope you'll share in the comment section below.

   




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